HOME Marion Crook creates adventures, mysteries and practical books of instruction. She researches her fiction as carefully as she researches her nonfiction, interviewing people who meet challenges, hardship, joy and excitement.

 

I have travelled from the rural community of Arctic Bay to the Appalachian hills of Kentucky, continually seeking new ideas from the people I meet. I am , primarily, a writer, but I have been a rancher, public health nurse, researcher and a university teacher. I enjoy talking to writers who look for inspiration and tips about writing. The world of social meda allows us all more exciting exchanges between writers and readers. You are invited to participate on my website.

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Recent Blog Posts

 

New Book –  New Tour

New Book – New Tour

  Writing for Children and Young Adults by Marion Crook  Blog Tour Schedule                                                          September 20—October 3, 2016 September…

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Virtual Tour   September 20

Virtual Tour September 20

September 20 Release Day Blitz Book Room Reviews http://www.bookroomreviews.com/ Delightful Book Review http://delightfulbookreviews.blogspot.ca/ Kit ‘N Kabookle http://kitnkabookle.blogspot.com/ Susan Heim on Writing http://www.susanheimonwriting.com/ Robyn Campbell Humor and Adventure Writing For Kids http://robyncampbell.com/ Aspiring Writer, Accomplished Nerd http://www.elenimcknight.net/ Lisa Haselton’s Reviews and Interviews http://lisahaseltonsreviewsandinterviews.blogspot.com/

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The Adoption Conference

The Adoption Conference

  Nashville, Tennessee, a land of green trees, wonderful people and 94% humidity. The adoption conference, North American Conference on Adoptable Children was, as usual, full of committed men and women working hard to educate themselves on how to help children who need homes, parents…

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What does independence look like?

What does independence look like?

Young adulthood is a difficult time for parents of adopted children. We want our children to be independent, make adult decisions, and find their own way in the world. We want them to develop separate and deep relationships with others while still remaining close to…

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The Protracted Identity Years

The Protracted Identity Years

Excerpt from Chapter Five Not every child who is adopted has severe abandonment issues. When the issues are periodic and mild, we count ourselves lucky. When they are serious, their effects can be debilitating for the child and very hard on the family. One of…

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