In the grey days of January here on the west coast of Canada, I find my myself tempted to hibernate. Then I look at the energy and activity of authors like Cathy Ace who bounce from one event to another, researching and writing clever books, promoting as she goes, encouraging new writers and contributing to her professional associations and I urge myself to more production. I do take my time writing a book. And I do have quite a bit on the go: Hazards in Hampshire is getting good reviews, my local cheerleading squad is encouraging. Sara Rosett gave Hazards in Hampshire a positive blurb. “Cozy fans will delight in the many references to popular fictional sleuths that are woven into the story, and they’ll also enjoy a peek into the life of ex-pat Claire as she settles into the English village.” —Sara Rosett, USA Today bestselling author of the Murder on Location series. Crime in Cornwall is getting ready for the printers, and Perils in Yorkshire needs one more reader before it is ready for editing. I am plotting the fourth book of this series,tentatively titled Confusion in the Cotswolds. I’m planning a trip to the Cotswolds in late April and then on to Kent, both trips related to future books. But this blog is not about writing, it’s about closets.

I have lived in my present house near the ocean for fifteen years. My closets contain fifteen years of accumulated bits and pieces. If I got hit by a bus, my children would curse me as they sorted through those closets. It’s time for a purge.

I planned the attack on the closets with one achievable goal per day, one room at a time. It’s unbelievable what I’ve stored. Items I haven’t seen in years: my mothers (probably her mother’s) doilies. For those who don’t know what a doily is, it’s (usually) a crocheted small lace mat that used to be placed under plates or cups. Of no use to me whatsoever. My mother used to starch them another bygone activity. There is also a twelve-foot-long tablecloth with a cut lace pattern which saw use once at my son’s wedding reception eons ago. There are tubs of pictures I never sorted. Balls of wool I never used. Jackets that I haven’t worn in twenty years and a tiny, full-length, formal, black lace, designer gown that I wore to attend dinner with Queen Elizabeth (along with 2500 other people). Now, that has memories connected to it! Much of what is stashed in my closets doesn’t hold memories; it’s simply junk. Some of it even the Salvation Army won’t accept.

I must complete this de-cluttering by the summer when my three youngest grandchildren are coming to stay. Unless I plan to put them in the closet, I’ll need to clean out the house so they have someplace to sleep and store their clothes and sports equipment. My current method is to create three piles: one to the dump, one to Salvation Army and one to the basement storage. I can see that I’m going to have a problem by summertime with a full and cluttered basement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crime in Cornwall is getting ready for the printers, and Perils in Yorkshire needs one more reader before it is ready for editing. I am planning the fourth tentatively titled Confusion in the Cotswolds. I am planning a trip to the Cotswolds in late April and then on to Kent, both trips related to future books. But this blog is not about writing, it’s about closets.

I have lived in my present house near the ocean for fifteen years. My closets contain fifteen years of accumulated bits and pieces. If I got hit by a bus, my children would curse me as they sorted through those closets. It’s time for a purge.

I planned the attack on the closets with one achievable goal per day, one room at a time. It’s unbelievable what I’ve stored. Items I haven’t seen in years: my mothers (probably her mother’s) doilies. For those who don’t know what a doily is, it’s (usually) a crocheted small lace mat that used to be placed under plates or cups. Of no use to me whatsoever. There is also a twelve-foot-long tablecloth with a cut lace pattern which saw use once at my son’s got wedding reception eons ago. There are tubs of pictures I never sorted. Balls of wool I never used. Jackets that I haven’t worn in twenty years and a tiny, full-length, formal, black lace, designer gown that I wore to attend dinner with Queen Elizabeth (along with 2500 other people). Now, that has memories connected to it. Much of what is stashed in my closets doesn’t hold memories; it’s simply junk. Some of it even the Salvation Army will not accept. I must complete this de-cluttering by the summer when my three youngest grandchildren are coming to stay. Unless I plan to put them in the closet, I’ll need to clean out the house so they have someplace to sleep and store their clothes and sports equipment.

My current method is to create three piles: one to the dump, one to Salvation Army and one to the basement storage. I can see that I’m going to have a problem by summertime with a full and cluttered basement.

 

2 Comments. Leave new

  • Kelly J Baker
    January 28, 2020 3:23 am

    I too am from the west coast of BC (pender island to be exact)
    I’ve just finished listening to your book Hazards in Hampshire and loved it so much. Looking forward to book two (and am hoping you’ve started on book three and if you haven’t, you better start 🙂
    Every time I read a mystery book (that takes place in UK) I am looking up the area. I would be a perfect candidate to go on the mystery book setting tours. Love so much the topic of your book and your heroine.
    Sounds like your going to have fun cleaning out and getting ready for your grandchildren!!
    Best of luck!!

    Reply
    • Hi Kelly, Lovely to hear from you. I finished Book III but the publishers aren’t ready for it yet, and I’m plotting Book IV which requires a research trip to England this spring. I met Kathy Ackley who conducts tours of the sites of mystery tours. She is organizing a trip this September to the Kent area. Unfortunately, I can’t go at that time.
      In book four Claire is taking her tour to the Cotswolds–at least I think she is. Sometimes, the plot takes its own path. I’m glad you enjoyed the book. Audio books really add an interesting dimension to the story.

      Reply

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